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20121205
20121205
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north-south access. we have a biannual that denver works on that brings people together for cultural, business, intellectual exchange and focuses on mexico and chile and brazil. one of the great things we're missing right now, it is part of the root of this mess about it -- immigration. our partners are right there. those old movies where people -- there was the girl next door, and the hero tries to fall in love with some likely candidates. she turns out to be loyal and ticks down her hair and -- takes down her hair and glasses. that is mexico. brazil and you'll get all those countries, we have to go look at china. we have to reach out to india. i went down to mexico on
year they told you about how they planned expansion in china. they said china would be its second largest market. schultz talked about getting into the tea business. i mention all of this so you understand that starbucks doesn't go in for idle chatter when it has these meetings. it has a terrific track record of following through on its plans. we want to know how the u.s. business is doing. and you need to hear about international. europe and especially china. starbucks is competing with keurig. don't forget, green mountain, it has been up huge. starbucks should tell us what it is going to do with its cash. maybe a special dividend. they have the cash to do it. i prefer them to grow with the money. this is a major bone of contention with the bulls. i think starbucks branching out is good. the bears, they seem to think that the coffee could be played out. starbucks will tell us about the new juice store concept and the bakery chain. maybe it will give us insight to what could end up being one of the three top markets for starbucks. india. i can't wait to hear about the projections
the treaty including china and russia. the treaty is modelled after existing u.s. law. former senator bob dole is 89 years old. he just got out of the hospital yesterday. and today he came to the senate floor in a wheelchair to support the treaty. eight republicans and two independents voted for the treaty including john mccain. but it wasn't enough. the treaty failed 61-38. >> it was solid then. he means it. and i think the organizing around it is so important. the labor movement, consumer groups, women's groups. >> i'm joined by a columnist for the nation magazine and howard fineman, msnbc political analyst. great to have you with us. howard, you first. when bob dole comes to the senate and he can't move people, where is the common sense? >> the senate is lost. that's the way i would put it. bob dole, one of the most revered figures. he's almost literally on his death bed a week or two ago. who summoned the courage to come to the senate to be the conscious on something he championed in 1990. this was senator bob dole, a republican. president george h. bush, republican. dick thorneberg,
and china. john fund, coauthor of the book "who's counting." you want a raise? you want a clerical worker? the money is pretty good. $87,000 a year. $105,000 with a compensation package. one of the top u.s. blue collar jobs. >> the outrageous thing about this strike is this. the port owners were willing to say all the clerks will have lifetime employment. but if someone retires we want the flexibility to move their job around or eliminate their position and the union said no. these clerks basically still use paper invoices to make sure the cargo moves clearly. a lot of that can be automated. these jobs, $165,000 are apparently forever. as a result of that we had this unnecessary strike and it cost a billion dollars a day and the price of toys may go up on christmas. >> this was not about benefits, vacation or pensions or salary. it was about the job of these clerks monitoring the port car go and their jobs are going to be guaranteed for life. but they wouldn't be allowed to replace them or eliminate those jobs once they retired. bill: so the debate was about what happens in the future. if
rights violators wherever they might be, whether in russia or syria or sudan or north korea or china or any other country. in other words, the senate committee-approved bill wisely adopted a global magnitsky standard. the reasoning for this is sound. because while the mechanism of u.s. visa denial for human rights violators was inspired by a single case in a single nation, the principles that it seeks to advance are universal. this bipartisan committee bill, unlike the house-passed version of the magnitsky act that we will soon vote on, does not single out russian human rights violators for visa denial but would apply the visa denial mechanism to people from any country who violate important human rights standards. the united states should be clear and firm in its commitment to protecting human rights. wherever the violation occur. and to holding those who violate those rights accountable to the best of our ability. including denying them visas to come to our country. human rights do not end at the borders of russia and anyone who violates those standards as so many did so blatantly
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)